Lessons from Nehemiah

Session One – The Desperate Need for a Godly Man (Nehemiah 1:1-3)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

Throughout history, the Lord has used particular men to “stand in the gap”. While we may not be another Apostle Paul, Martin Luther, Charles Spurgeon, or a Billy Graham, we are called, as men, to follow Christ and to serve as godly-servant leaders. The book of Nehemiah provides intentional, practical insight on how to walk with God and allow God to work through us for His glory. In our study of one of Israel’s greatest leaders, Nehemiah, we will glean much from a man who modeled a life of great character, discipline, determination, zeal, and grace.

Session Two – Crying Out to God in the Midst of Adversity (Nehemiah 1:4-11)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

Faced with the horrific news concerning Jerusalem and his countrymen, Nehemiah is overcome with grief. Through the tears, Nehemiah turns to the Lord. This opening prayer of this Old Testament book lays out one of the finest models of prayers in the entire Bible. This cupbearer from Susa provides key principles in how to approach God—principles that are extremely applicable even for today!

Session Three – Prayer, Action, and God’s Sovereignty (Nehemiah 2:1-8)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

Four months have passed since Nehemiah heard the horrific news concerning his homeland. However, rather than throwing up his arms in despair and in hopelessness, Nehemiah turns to the Lord. Forty-eight weeks of fervent prayer and research, this Persian cupbearer makes a very calculated step to approach King Artaxerxes. This scene displays a beautiful picture of human responsibility and God’s sovereignty working in tandem to bring about God’s glory.

Session Four – Prayer and Confidence in the Midst of Chaos (Nehemiah 2:9-20)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

After four months of praying and planning, not to mention, journeying for two months to Jerusalem, Nehemiah finally arrived in Judah. Clearly the task was daunting and the opposition intense. Yet, instead of launching immediately into construction or calling a meeting for Jewish leaders to discuss this building project, Nehemiah spends time with the Lord, assessing the situation first-hand. Nehemiah’s actions reveal not only his character, they also provide some important principles for all those who wish to be used mightily by the Lord.

Session Five – Working with Others in Service to the Lord (Nehemiah 3:1-32)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

Chapter 3 of Nehemiah contains a litany of names that are difficult to pronounce, information that is repetitive and appears rather meaningless, and obscure locations that are largely forgotten today. Thus, it is little surprise that some of the most prominent books on the study of Nehemiah fail to discuss this chapter. And yet, a closer observation of this chapter reveals several important principles both for leadership and for unity within God’s people. In so doing, these principles afford the opportunity for God’s community to come together to accomplish great things for His glory!

Session Six – Living in the Midst of Opposition & Discouragement (Nehemiah 4:1-23)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

In reading chapter 3, we assume that the rebuilding of the walls and gates of Jerusalem went without a glitch. However, Nehemiah 4 quickly reveals that the arduous task of rebuilding the walls was met with great opposition. This adversity led to discouragement and threatened the successful completion of the construction project. Despite the criticism, discouragement, and adversity, Nehemiah and the Israelites persevered as they looked to the Lord.

Session Seven – Facing Internal Problems: Leading with Character (Nehemiah 5:1-13)

Presented by Dr. David Hoffeditz

To this point in the story, it would seem that the Israelites are completely behind Nehemiah in this daunting building project. His only opposition had originated from “outside the camp”. However, in chapter 5, we learn that Nehemiah also faced great opposition from his own people. One author aptly writes, “The productive sounds of a wall being raised up have been replaced with the destructive sounds of people tearing one another down” (Swindoll, Hand Me Another Brick Study Guide, 48). In the midst of these internal problems, Nehemiah provides several important principles for godly leaders.